Be the Expert

As a writer, I’m often asked a question that is immensely difficult for me to answer:

What is your story about?

When I hear this question, my brain rifles through many answers, but can never settle on just one. I often find myself starting my answer with details about the story’s premise, but end up switching gears somewhere. It’s not because I’m a scatterbrain (though some might argue against this), but because I feel that I have so much to say.

Portrait of Henry Ford (ca. 1919)

Image via Wikipedia

It’s like asking Henry Ford, “tell me some things about an automobile.” Would he respond with “oh, well, it has an engine, some doors, and four wheels?” No! He’d likely go into laborious detail about it, because of his intimate knowledge on the subject. Much to the chagrin of the questioner, no doubt.

As writers, we are experts in the field of our stories. No one knows them better than we do. So, it’s only natural to have the urge to over answer on such a question. So what if your cousin obviously stops listening to you 20 seconds later, they asked!

But what happens when the question is posed by someone other than your cousin? An agent or editor, perhaps? Is it necessary (or appropriate) to give a long, drawn-out explanation of your story?

As soon as possible, a writer should develop a short hook about the story that can be delivered in 15 seconds or less. Think of it as the description that will go on the back of your book someday.

Larry Brooks of Storyfix.com has a great post to help you do this that can be found here.

Remember, you’re the expert here, you’ve got plenty of material/ideas/thoughts to pull from to put your pitch together. It’s important that you give just the right amount of detail to grab your listener’s (or reader’s) attention, then end with a statement that will make them ask for more.

When has your pitch worked for you? Let me know in the comments below.

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About The Weekend Writer

I've had a passion for the written word ever since I learned to hold a pencil. I wrote prolifically in my youth, but less as I grew older. Now, I write around a full-time life like many of you. I hope to share encouragement, success stories, and helpful information with fellow writers of all stages, including weekend writers like myself.

Posted on March 17, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. Good post! David Coe posted a great article a couple weeks ago about how to whittle down your book’s summary into an effective quick-pitch. I highly recommend it.

    http://www.magicalwords.net/david-b-coe/on-writing-and-publishing-refining-your-elevator-pitch/

    I’ve been working on my pitch. Check it out:

    http://adamsapple2day.blogspot.com/2012/02/working-on-your-elevator-pitch.html

  2. Thanks for sharing, Adam! And you’ve got a very nice pitch, sounds like an interesting tale.

  3. I just attended a three-hour pitch workshop, which was really worthwhile. It’s hard to condense a story into a sentence, but with feedback, it can be done.

    ~Debbie

  1. Pingback: What’s in a Name?: How to Develop Your Title « The Weekend Writer

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