Top 5 Most Important Moments of Your Story

Class 92 hauled container-freight train on the...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In life, there are many important moments. Some, such as graduating, getting married, or having a child, are some of what many consider to be the most important.

Like life, our written works contain a few moments that are the most important. In my journey as a writer, I have found the following to be 5 of the most important moments of a story (sorted chronologically):

1. The Beginning

Uh, ya think? Not only does the beginning of your story have the job of getting the narrative train rolling down tens of thousands of words, but it is also host to the all-important hook. This is where you give your reader a reason to keep going. Will they board the story train, or not?

2. The Point of No Return

Believe it or not, this is the point where the reason for your telling the story actually begins. Everything before it has just served to “set-up” the story. It is at this juncture where the world as your protagonist knows it has changed, and he or she has a new need or quest (i.e. solving the story problem). The conductor has jumped off the train as it loses control, and our hero makes the decision to help stop it.

3. The Midpoint Shift

About halfway through your story is another shift. This is a point where it is easy to let your story sag, but you can use it to add a new element or twist to the story. It is also the point in which your protagonist will make a decision, usually to take down the story problem. The train has switched tracks, and the previous plan to stop it is ruined. The hero takes matters into his own hands.

4. Failure is Imminent

This is the lowest point for the protagonist. All of their efforts are in vein, allies have died, and the antagonist is on the brink of winning. Everything the protagonist has worked for since the story problem began is for granted. The hero has made it to the brake switch in the lead car, but it is jammed.

5. The Ending

This one is pretty much a no brainer. If this list was in order of importance, this might be listed first. Here, the protagonist is able to take all they’ve learned as the story’s progressed, and solve the story problem (usually at great risk to themselves). It is usually the icing on the cake for the reader, if you deliver an ending that justifies their spending hours reading your story. The hero climbs below the train and manually activates the train’s brakes, getting injured in the process but saving everyone on board.


For additional resources on story structure, by which this post was inspired, check out Story Engineering by Larry Brooks. For screenwriters (and authors, too), check out Save The Cat! by Blake Snyder.

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About The Weekend Writer

I've had a passion for the written word ever since I learned to hold a pencil. I wrote prolifically in my youth, but less as I grew older. Now, I write around a full-time life like many of you. I hope to share encouragement, success stories, and helpful information with fellow writers of all stages, including weekend writers like myself.

Posted on April 30, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. Hello you’ve been nominated for the Kreativ Blogger Award. See my most for details: http://novelsgroundup.wordpress.com/2012/05/14/thrilled-and-honored/

  2. I knew all this, but one can never get too many reminders. In fact, I’m going to my story right now and make Failure Is Imminent much stronger.

  1. Pingback: This Week in Favs | Melinda S. Collins

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